Ambien

Ambien is a sedative-hypnotic used for the short-term treatment of insomnia (difficulty falling or staying asleep).

 

 

 

 

Ambien
5 mg Tablets
(30 pills)
No consultation fee
Not Available

 

Ambien
5 mg Tablets
(60 pills)
No consultation fee
Not Available
  Ambien
10 mg Tablets
(30 pills)
No consultation fee
Not Available
  Ambien
10 mg Tablets
(60 pills)
No consultation fee
Not Available

Ambien Sleep Aids

Zolpidem tartrate, is a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic of the imidazopyridine class and is available in 5 mg and 10 mg strength tablets for oral administration. Chemically, zolpidem is N,N,6-trimethyl-2-p-toyl-imidazo(1,2,-a)pyridine-3-acetamide L-(+)-tartrate (2:1). Zolpidem tartrate is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is sparingly soluble in water, alcohol, and propylene glycol. It has a molecular weight of 764.88.

Each Ambien tablet includes the following inactive ingredients: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, sodium starch glycolate, titanium dioxide; the 5 mg tablet also contains FD&C Red No. 40, iron oxide colorant, and polysorbate 80.

Sleep Disorders

We all have an occasional night of poor sleep. For many individuals however, sleep problems are much more common and may be chronic. Sleep can be disturbed by a number of factors: emotional stress, work schedule, environmental interference, medications and by physical health conditions.

Ambien - Uses

Ambien is in a class of drugs called sedative / hypnotics or sleep medications. Ambien affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause insomnia. Ambien induces sleep and causes relaxation. It is used to treat sleep disorders such as trouble falling asleep, waking up many times during the night, or waking up too early in the morning. Ambien is for short-term use only--usually 7 to 10 days. Longer-term use must be monitored closely by a doctor. Ambien may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Ambien - Directions

Take ambien exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take ambien just before you go to bed. It will make you drowsy, and you could fall and hurt yourself if you take your dose too long before you are ready for sleep. Do not take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. Do not stop taking ambien suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with ambien. Store ambien at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Ambien - Side Effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking ambien and seek emergency medical attention: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; hives); or hallucinations, abnormal behavior, or severe confusion. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take ambien and talk to your doctor if you experience headache, drowsiness, dizziness, or clumsiness; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation; depression; muscle aches or pains; vivid or abnormal dreams; or amnesia (memory loss) after a dose. Ambien is habit forming. Stopping this medication suddenly can cause withdrawal effects if you have taken it continuously for several weeks. Talk to your doctor about the safe use of this medication. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

Ambien - Precautions

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Ambien will cause drowsiness and may cause dizziness. If you experience drowsiness or dizziness, avoid these activities. Ambien should be taken just before bedtime, but you may experience some carryover effects the next day. Do not drink alcohol while taking ambien. Alcohol will increase drowsiness and may increase dizziness while you are taking ambien, which could be dangerous. Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers, including over-the-counter preparations. They should not be used while you are taking ambien unless your doctor directs otherwise.

Ambien - Drug Interactions

Ambien may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, other sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with ambien. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

Ambien - Notes

Your pharmacist has additional information about ambien written for health professionals that you may read.

Ambien - Missed Dose

Since ambien is usually taken only if you need it to help you sleep, missing a dose will not cause any problems. Take the missed dose only if you can be sure that you will get 7 or 8 full hours of sleep after the dose. If you do not sleep for 7 or 8 full hours, you may experience carryover effects from ambien after you wake up.

 

The following links to other Web sites are provided as additional sources of sleep disorder information for your patients:

National Sleep Foundation
The National Sleep Foundation is a nonprofit organization that promotes public understanding of sleep and sleep disorders and supports sleep-related education, research, and advocacy to improve public health and safety.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine
The AASM was founded to increase awareness of sleep disorders among the public and professional communities. It is the major national organization for sleep disorders medicine.4

American Sleep Apnea Association
The American Sleep Apnea Association is a nonprofit organization that works to educate the public about sleep apnea and serves as an advocate for people affected by this common disorder. People with sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during sleep, sometimes hundreds of times each night and often for a minute or longer.